The Scandinavian Adventure – Visiting the Vigelandsparken

The Scandinavian Adventure – Visiting the Vigelandsparken

Saturday, July 25, 2014

Today is the final day of Solo’s and my Scandinavian Adventure. Tomorrow he is going to return to Tennessee. These last five weeks have passed so fast, too fast. At the same time, it feels like months ago since I first picked Solo up at the airport. However, we still have some time left to enjoy ourselves, the time to say our goodbyes has not yet come.

The heat wave has taken hold in southern Norway. Today promises to be another nice, but hot, summer’s day, which we are going to spend in the Naked People Park. The official name is Frogner Parken and the Vigelandsparken, or “Naked People Park” as Solo calls it, is a part of it.
We are taking the bus toward Majorstuen. From here it is only a short walk to the Park’s entrance; we could have taken another bus for the remaining two stops to Frogner Parken. However, who would do so when the weather is as beautiful as it is today?

The Vigelands Parken is the largest sculpture park in the world. A rare feature of it is that Gustav Vigeland (*1869, †1943) created all the sculptures in the park as well as the park’s layout. The nearby Vigeland Museum was Gustav Vigeland’s last atelier and home.
The park is home to more than 200 statues of naked humans made of wrought iron, bronze, and granite. Most of the statues are placed along the park’s 850m long Boulevard. They are grouped in five units from the Main gate via the fountain to the Monolith and ending at the Wheel of Life.

These sculptures are the masterpiece of Gustav Vigeland’s work. He created more than these statues though. For example, the (dressed) one of Snorre Sturlarsson, displayed in Bergen and Reykjavik, belongs to his work.

The Monolith, formed out of one single piece of granite, has a height of 14.12 meters (17.3 meters with the plinth). It displays 121 figures of men, inwoven with each other, and it is an impressive piece of artwork.

A staircase and a little park within the park, separate the Monolith from the Boulevard and the fountain. Within this park within the park, I am enjoying a few minutes of macro photography. Chasing some too fast butterflies and capturing some blossoms instead.

When we arrived at the park, there weren’t too many people around. However, now that we are ready to leave, a tourist group arrives, and the park becomes almost crowded. Refreshed from a break in a small cafe we start our return to my apartment. On the way back have a look around in a bicycle shop, looking for some tools that would be nice for me to have. They do not have them either.
Since Solo has not seen much of Oslo during our Adventure, I choose another bus route for our trip back to my place. Instead of aiming for the 31 bus we are going to take the 25. Not only do we skip changing busses but this route takes us through a beautiful area and will double for a little bit of sightseeing as well. I did not realize it when I choose the bus route, but after a while, the bus turns onto the very same street we cycled on during our very first bicycle ride before the Scandinavian Adventure officially started. The circle closes now.

Within the past five weeks, we have cycled 1292.30 kilometers (803 miles), spent countless hours on trains and ferries and visited three different countries together–one only very briefly. Too sad our travels have come to an end. I have taken about 3000 photos during this journey, through which I will be able to relive the adventure.

We will enjoy another evening together before Solo’s final departure. While this adventure comes to its end, it will not be the last one. I am already planning to see him in Tennessee for a fall season. Until then letters and emails will help keep in touch.

If you liked this post, you might also like the other stories from my Scandinavian Adventure:

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